Air/Oil Separator Matrix Integrated Into Crankcase Applied To An Opposed-Piston, Two-Stroke Engine

An opposed-piston, internal combustion engine includes a breather assembly located on the top of the exhaust side crankcase that has a matrix integrated into the breather casting to separate oil flowing therein from the crankcase air ventilation flow.

Inventor: Paul Meckl

Disclosure Number: D491A

BACKGROUND

The subject matter relates to an opposed-piston engine where a matrix designed into the body of the engine breather assembly ensures that oil is kept from being entrained in the crankcase airflow by allowing the oil to collect on the walls of the matrix and then drain out of holes in the bottom of the breather assembly.

FIGURES

FIG. 1. Shows the breather assembly located on the topside of the exhaust crankcase.

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the top portion of the breather assembly of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a side cross sectional view of the top-side of the breather assembly of FIG. 2 that details the design of the matrix.

DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 illustrates an opposed-piston, internal combustion engine with its breather assembly located on the top of the engine at the exhaust crankcase end.  The breather assembly is critical to maintaining a pressure level within the crankcase assembly to ensure that crankcase seals are not ruptured by excessive pressure buildup that would result in an oil spill.  But it is also important to avoid crankcase lubricant oil from entering the air ventilation, pressure relief, flow.   The herein described invention incorporates a matrix structure within the air breather assembly to collect crankcase oil on its walls and then transport that oil through holes in the base of the breather assembly back into the lubricant source.

D491A Fig 1

FIG. 1


Referring to FIG. 2, the matrix structure is clearly visible in the isometric cross sectional view of the top of the breather assembly, This matrix structure interrupts the flow of any crankcase lubricant oil that may enter the breather assembly as it collides with, and is captured by, the walls of the matrix and then is allowed to vent out holes in the bottom of the breather assembly.  Therefore, no oil is allowed to enter the air ventilation flow within the breather assembly.

D491A Fig 2

FIG.2


A cross sectional view of the matrix assembly shown in FIG. 3 more clearly identifies the structure of one possible configuration of the matrix assembly.  This, however, does not limit any number of other matrix designs that could perform the same function as described herein.

D491A Fig 3

FIG. 3